401(k) / 403(b) Participants

                                        

401(k) Plans - Qualified cash or deferred arrangements (CODAs) permitted under Section 401(k) of the Internal Revenue Code, commonly referred to as "401(k) plans," have become one of the most popular types of employer-sponsored retirement plans.
 
The Roth 401(k) - Some employers offer 401(k) plan participants the opportunity to make Roth 401(k) contributions. If you're lucky enough to work for an employer who offers this option, Roth contributions could play an important role in helping enhance your retirement income.
 
In-Service Withdrawals from 401(k) Plans - You may be familiar with the rules for putting money into a 401(k) plan. But are you familiar with the rules for taking your money out? Federal law limits the withdrawal options that a 401(k) plan can offer. But a 401(k) plan may offer fewer withdrawal options than the law allows, and may even provide that you can't take any money out at all until you leave employment. However, many 401(k) plans are more flexible.
 
403(b) Plans - A 403(b) plan is an employer-sponsored retirement plan for certain employees of public schools, tax-exempt (501(c)(3)) organizations, and churches. The employer can purchase annuity contracts for eligible employees, or establish custodial accounts to be invested in mutual funds or other investments. In the case of annuity contracts, a 403(b) plan is sometimes referred to as a tax-sheltered annuity (TSA) plan. (Church plans are subject to several special rules not covered here.)
 
The Roth 403(b) - Some employers offer 403(b) plan participants the opportunity to make Roth 403(b) contributions. If you're lucky enough to work for an employer who offers this option, Roth contributions could play an important role in maximizing your retirement.